Learning about Health – Day 51

English: Broth Svenska: Buljong

English: Broth Svenska: Buljong (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I don’t know how this happened exactly, but I seemed to have diverted (a bit) from reading and writing about Dr. Junger’s Clean Program. My last post took me up to chapter six where I learned about intestinal health.

Somehow I got focused on intestinal health and revisited some earlier information I had explored several months ago. Has anyone heard of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride?

Dr. Campbell-McBride is a medical doctor with two postgraduate degrees: Master of Medical Sciences in Neurology and Master of Medical Sciences in Human Nutrition.

She is well-known for developing a concept of GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome). GAPS is a natural treatment for Autism, ADHD/ADD, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, Depression and Schizophrenia.

In addition, the GAPS Nutritional Protocol will help with all digestive disorders, autoimmune disease, eating disorders, epilepsy, failure to thrive, childhood disease, problems with development, and much more.

If this interests you, here is the link to a 5-minute video where Natasha discusses the importance of healthy gut flora (click here).

One of the staples in the GAPS Nutritional Protocol is bone broth. Lots of bone broth and lots of soup made with bone broth. Not only is the bone broth important, it’s crucial to scrape the bones clean of all meaty bits (cartilage/connective tissue) and including adding vinegar to the water to help extract the minerals from the bones and tapping the bones to extract the bone marrow.

So — for the last two weeks, I’ve been enjoying bone broth. The first week, I tried beef bones. The second week, chicken bones. This week it’s beef bones again. I may try making broth with fish bones soon.

In addition to the bone broth, Dr. McBride recommends to slowly add fermented foods and probiotics into the diet. Her website offers a great amount of information to help get a person started (click here to read).

What started me thinking seriously about intestinal health is a situation that occurred three weeks ago. I caught the flu (I haven’t had the flu since my son was 4 yrs. old).

I didn’t eat a thing for two days and anything I had eaten prior to that, left my body rather quickly. For the next three days, I ate very sparingly.

The reason I mention this is because I made a wonderful discovery.

When I had no food in my system, the RA symptoms subsided greatly. Inflammation in my joints lessened considerably. When food was re-introduced, RA symptoms increased again.

This flu episode  started me wondering if this RA autoimmune disease has something to do with the state of my gut.

I figure it’s worth spending the time to see if the GAPS diet and Clean program have an effect on the state of my health. If nothing else, it will keep my busy and out of trouble (hehehe).

That’s all for now. Thank you for taking the time to read this learning about health series. Wishing everyone a wonderful week!

Advertisements

Learning about Health – Day 25

Countryside near the TVA site of the Douglas dam, Tenn. (LOC)
A Simpler Time.

If you are new to this site and wondering what this is about, I’ve given myself a 100-day health challenge. I’m using Dr. Junger’s book, Clean – Remove Restore Rejuvenate to guide me through his three-week detoxification program.

I write what I learn from each chapter as I go through Dr. Junger’s book. Hopefully, it will help me to stay committed to completing the detoxification plan. If this sounds like something that interests you, I highly recommend purchasing Dr. Junger’s book (just so you know, I don’t receive a commission should you decide to purchase).

The title for chapter six is, “The Common Root of Dysfunction: Digging for Answers.” Sounds like we’re getting somewhere.

“When the leaves of a plant start looking sick, wise gardeners will dig out the root to take a look.”

Dr. Junger writes that healthy leaves come from healthy nutrient rich soil. By studying other traditions of healing he learned the concept that health and disease start in the intestines.”

Dr. Junger compares the human gastrointestinal system to that of plant roots. The intestines absorb nutrients from our food that function as building blocks that make our bodies.  He states that every single organ or function in the body has a direct link to the intestines.”

Up to eighty percent of our immune system is found in the intestines.

In this chapter, Dr. Junger discusses the four major constituents of the gut system.

The first is the intestinal flora. A healthy intestine contains about two pounds of helpful bacteria.”

The system malfunctions  when nutrient depletion results from inadequate intestinal flora. The helpful bacteria protect us from infections and disease-causing bacteria. Beneficial flora, neutralizes toxins before they get into the bloodstream and keep the bowels regularly moving toxins out of the body.

Modern living creates an imbalance in the gut with things like toxic chemicals, medications, especially antibiotics, alcohol, caffeine and stress.

Yeast is one organism that over-grows when intestinal flora is out of balance. Yeast thrives on sweet foods and dairy products and makes us bloated and gassy by irritating the intestinal lining.

Restoring the intestinal flora is part of the Clean program.

The second major constituent is the intestinal wall. The intestinal lining acts as a barrier to unwanted substances from getting inside and to bacteria, toxins and undigested food from getting out into the bloodstream.

When the intestinal wall cells are smooth, this is known as a healthy intestine. Sometimes cracks occur due to lower healthy bacteria levels caused by inflammation, food sensitivity, excessive alcohol, coffee, preservatives, certain types of medications, and other irritants.

When cracks occur the intestines become permeable. This condition is called Leaky Gut Syndrome.

The third major constituent is the gut-associated lymphatic tissue (GALT). The GALT is the system that mounts the attack against toxic bacteria and chemicals in food and when undigested pieces cross the intestinal-wall barrier, the immune system goes full force.

Dr. Junger states, “Simply from exposure to the standard American diet, our GALT tends to live in a high state of alert, constantly initiating immune responses.”

“Healthy intestinal flora is key to healthy immunity, including ordinary defense against all kinds of colds and bugs.”

The fourth major constituent is nerve cells. Around the intestines and GALT are almost as many nerves cells as in the brain. You know those “gut instincts” you have. The ones that are usually right, but pushed aside when your brain knows better.

It’s because of these nerve cells that the intestines can control their own functions independent of the brain. Apparently, the intestinal nerve cells communicate just like brain neurons — with neurotransmitters.

In fact, Dr. Junger discovered that 80 to 90 percent of the bodies serotonin is made by the intestinal nerve cells. Serotonin is responsible for producing feelings of happiness and well-being.  Isn’t that really interesting?

An equally interesting topic discussed is on gene expression. Things that affect whether a gene is turned on or turned off are; food, emotions, thoughts, accumulated toxins and environmental influences such as heat, light, sound, radiation, etc.

The science of nutrigenomics studies how our food affects gene expression. Researchers at John Hopkins University discovered “sulforaphane” found in the seeds of broccoli, “toned down the expression of certain cancer genes.” Now we know, genes do not equal destiny.

On a personal note, it’s very clear to me where I need to focus my efforts in healing from RA; a healthy intestinal eco-system.

Next post will explore chapter seven, “The Clean Program“.

To read a summary of chapter five, click here.

A journey is always more fun with company and so I thank each and every one from the bottom of my heart for accompanying me on this learning about health experience.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be used to diagnose or treat symptoms or medical conditions. Always consult a qualified medical professional.

Learning about Health – Day 18

Microsoft Office Images

Microsoft Office Images

In chapter five of Clean – Remove Restore Rejuvenate, Dr. Junger explores what toxins are and teaches us about how they affect our health.

Dr. Junger states, Toxins have many ways of interfering with the normal physiology of life.”

Toxins, such as arsenic, blocks the oxygen needed to fully metabolize glucose. Other toxins, block enzymes, or stimulate body functions that begin to cause damage, such as caffeine.

Caffeine stimulates the adrenals causing an increased heart rate, blood pressure, alertness and body temperature. When taken several times a day these reactions can exhaust the adrenal glands.

This happened to me. I use to drink several cups of coffee daily and smoke a pack or more of cigarettes.

“Other toxins kill the good bacteria in the intestinal tract, block oxygen from binding to red blood cells, interfere with DNA synthesis by switching genes on and off, or block the absorption of different vitamins.”

Toxins interfere with the body’s ability to balance itself and when there are numerous kinds of toxins in the body, it’s impossible to predict their effects.

Dr. Junger began noticing the symptom of “puffiness” in his patients. He uses this term to describe a state known as “mucus” by Eastern forms of medicine.

Ayurveda medicine says that toxic foods and toxic thoughts present a “mucusy heaviness in the body.” Chinese medicine says this mucus is found in and around the cells, in the blood, in the GI tract and in your thoughts.

Mucus isn’t all bad though as it is the bodies natural defense against irritants. An example is when you inhale pepper. The nose runs trying to get the irritant out so that it doesn’t damage the nose lining.

Dr. Junger’s book completely explains why and where this mucus gets stuck and how it creates havoc in our bodies. And, the more we eat and snack, the more the mucus builds up and can’t leave the body.

“When you eat sparingly, take in nutrients that promote detoxification and start exercising, you “de-puff.”

Dr. Junger explains that an effective detoxification program will help shed weight (water and mucus), whiten eyes, firm skin, especially in the face, provide a sense of clarity and lightness in body and mind as vital fresh food attracts uplifted thought.

Constipation, allergies, depression, irritable bowel syndrome are some of the conditions that Dr. Junger’s patients are overcoming through his detoxification program.

Dr. Junger goes on to explain the bodies ecosystem and how toxins affect the bodies environment in fascinating detail. It makes one appreciate just how precious and miraculous it is to have a body.

If this information interests you at all, I highly recommend purchasing Dr. Junger’s book, Clean – Remove Restore Rejuvenate.

Next post will explore chapter six.

To read a summary of chapters three and four, click here.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be used to diagnose or treat symptoms or medical conditions. Always consult a qualified medical professional.

Non-believers won’t read this

and here’s why;

They don’t believe a problem exists.

If they agree a problem exists; they don’t believe the problem is worthy of attention.

They don’t have time for the so-called “do-gooders”.

This post is for the converted. The believers. It’s for the people who are weary of the status quo.

It’s for the change-agents who aspire to rise above status quo into loftier qualities of compassion, unselfish concern for others, responsibility and decisive action.

Amanda Todd ended her life on October 10, 2012. Amanda was fifteen years old. Amanda could no longer live with the pain of the past three-year’s of cruelty hurled upon her by a blackmailing cyber stalker and her peers.

Amanda Todd could be your daughter or grand-daughter. She could be your niece, cousin, sister, student or class-mate.

Bullying is such a common occurrence that many of us mistakenly believe is normal. Many of us are victims of bullying from our families, relationships, schools and workplaces. Bullying infects every aspect of society.

No one is immune. Some of us project the effects externally onto others; our kids, our spouses, our pets, our relatives, our workmates, the poor, the weak, the vulnerable.

Some of us quietly endure the effects inwardly day after day hoping that others won’t notice our wounded-ness.

Amanda Todd began advocating for victims of bullying in a video she posted in September called, “My Story:Struggling, bullying, suicide, self harm.”

Carol Todd, Amanda’s mother said in an interview that she “has launched a trust fund in Amanda’s memory to raise money for anti-bullying awareness education and for support programs for youth with mental health issues.”

Let us continue the advocacy Amanda Todd began with her video because “we should not rest.”
Be a voice or help support a voice. If there is enough of us, eventually the non-believers will follow.
Related article • Amanda Todd is an Angel

Learning about Love: Day 75 – Teachings from the Dalai Lama

Cardinal HE Donald Wuerl welcomes His Holiness...

Cardinal HE Donald Wuerl welcomes His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My one hundred day learning about love challenge is three-quarters over. It seems like it was just last week that I posted part two of teachings from the Dalai Lama. I was shocked to realize it was twenty-five days ago.

But even though one hundred days is only twenty-five days away, I’ll continue this learning about love challenge beyond and see what miracles unfold.

Most of you know the last two posts focused on the teachings of the Dalai Lama.  In Learning about Love:  Day 48, we learned that according to His Holiness:

  • The purpose of life is to be happy.
  • We achieve happiness through mental peace.
  • Mental peace comes from the development of love and compassion.
  • Love and compassion is developed through caring for the happiness of others and cultivating a close, warm-hearted feeling for others.
  • Whether we want to admit it or not, the truth is, we are interdependent with one another.
  • Mutual cooperation is evident in nature.
  • When babies and children are raised in unhappy homes where affection, cuddling and love are withheld they have impaired development and lack the ability for love.
  • “the affection and respect of others are vital for our happiness.” Dalai Lama

Then, we learned in Learning about Love:  Day 50:

  • Our need for love is the foundation of our existence because our existence is dependent on the help (love) of others.
  • The main cause of depression is lack of the affection (compassion/love) from others.
  • Obstacles to the development of compassion are; an innate self-centeredness, desire and attachment, personal neediness.
  • Compassion is not only an emotional response. It’s a reasoned firm commitment toward another that doesn’t change when they behave negatively.

Now, we learn how to develop compassion.

First off, the Dalai Lama is quick to point out that developing this kind of compassion is not easy at all.

His Holiness appeals to the power of human reasoning. Regardless of the vast differences in personality, character traits and behaviors, each one of us is a human being. Each one of us has a desire for happiness and wishes to avoid suffering. Each one of us has a right to happiness and avoid suffering. All human beings are equal in their right to obtain happiness.

“Now, when you recognize that all beings are equal in both their desire for happiness and their right to obtain it, you automatically feel empathy and closeness for them. Through accustoming your mind to this sense of universal altruism, you develop a feeling of responsibility for others: the wish to help them actively overcome their problems. Nor is this wish selective; it applies equally to all. As long as they are human beings experiencing pleasure and pain just as you do, there is no logical basis to discriminate between them or to alter your concern for them if they behave negatively.”

He states that we have such trouble developing this kind of compassion because we are attached to feeling independent and self-existent. (I think the Dalai Lama is saying that we think we are the only ones that matter. It’s all about ME way of thinking.)

How do we start developing compassion? The Dalai Lama answers:

  • Remove anger and hatred.
  • Develop faculties of reason and patience.
  • When a problem occurs, remain humble. Be sincere and concerned the outcome is fair.
  • It is possible to adopt a firm stand while maintaining compassion. One may act strongly without anger.
  • Help prevent others from suffering the consequences of their own acts.
  • Consider enemies your best teacher. Be grateful for this.
  • Practice makes perfect.
  • Be concerned for your friends. Help them. Serve them. Make more friends.
  • When we loose our status, health and finances, we learn what true friendship is.
  • Greet all people you meet as a brother or sister because we all share an identical need for love.
  • A sincere and open heart brings self-worth and confidence.
  • Develop good human qualities.

This brings me to the end of writing about love and compassion from the Dalai Lama. I think it’s time I went out and practiced now.

I hope you enjoyed this post as well as the last two posts on the teachings of the Dalai Lama. Please visit the link below (source) to read the entire article as I have only provided a summary here on the blog.

Source: His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet website.

I wish to express my sincere thank you to His Holiness for the work he does in this world. I have a much better understanding of how to develop my capacity for compassion now.

Learning about Love: Day 50 – Teachings from the Dalai Lama

English: Ursula Goodenough with His Holiness t...

English: Ursula Goodenough with His Holiness the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, India, ASCB (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As I mentioned in the previous post, I’m learning about love and compassion from His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

In addition, I’m reading a book titled, “Owning Your Own Shadow”, author, Robert A. Johnson (1991).  I plan to outline some of the ideas explored by Johnson who is an acclaimed Jungian analyst and best selling author in a future post.

It will be interesting to see how the two topics meld, or not.

By the way, the reason I’m reading the shadow book is to fulfill a requirement to write a reflection paper on the topic of Psychology and Spirituality for a year long spiritual deepening program I enrolled in last June.

I am thrilled to participate in the program because it’s exactly what I was looking for; a focused way to deepen my spiritual journey. The program began in June with a five-day retreat which was phenomenal. It will end next June with a four-day retreat and in between we have a number of requirements to fulfill. I may write about it in more detail in a later post.

To get back to the Dalai Lama teachings, I’ll recap a few points from last post;

  • The purpose of life is to be happy.
  • We achieve happiness through mental peace.
  • Mental peace comes from the development of love and compassion.
  • Love and compassion is developed through caring for the happiness of others and cultivating a close, warm-hearted feeling for others.
  • Whether we want to admit it or not, the truth is, we are interdependent with one another.
  • Mutual cooperation is evident in nature.
  • When babies and children are raised in unhappy homes where affection, cuddling and love are withheld they have impaired development and lack the ability for love.
  • “the affection and respect of others are vital for our happiness.” Dalai Lama

The preceding points are summed up by the following statement from His Holiness;

“It is because our own human existence is so dependent on the help of others that our need for love lies at the very foundation of our existence.”

If interdependence is a fundamental law of nature, then why do many of us live isolated from others with an emphasis on self-reliance and self-sufficiency?

“Recently I met a group of scientists in America who said that the rate of mental illness in their country was quite high-around twelve percent of the population. It became clear during our discussion that the main cause of depression was not a lack of material necessities but a deprivation of the affection of the others.”

Do we as a society refrain from the display of human affection in our daily life?

“whether or not we are consciously aware of it, from the day we are born, the need for human affection is in our very blood. Even if the affection comes from an animal or someone we would normally consider an enemy, both children and adults will naturally gravitate towards it.”

What are some obstacles to the development of compassion?

  • “we all have an innate self-centeredness that inhibits our love for others.”
  • “Many forms of compassionate feeling are mixed with desire and attachment.”
  • “love (that is) motivated more by personal need than by genuine care for the other individual.”

What exactly is compassion?

“True compassion is not just an emotional response but a firm commitment founded on reason. Therefore, a truly compassionate attitude towards others does not change even if they behave negatively.”

Wow! It seems to me, from reading this, that it takes a high degree of awareness to consistently demonstrate love and compassion in all affairs.

The next post will address how to accomplish this task.

Source: His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet website.

Learning about Love: Day 48 – Teachings from the Dalai Lama

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama brings togeth...

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama brings together Buddhists and Western scientists every two years. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Recently, I felt drawn to study teachings from His Holiness the  Dalai Lama. While I am still in the early stages of study, I felt called to share what I’ve learned thus far.

According to the Dalai Lama, the purpose of life is to be happy and the way to achieve happiness is through mental peace. His Holiness states,

“From my own limited experience, I have found that the greatest degree of inner tranquility comes from the development of love and compassion.”

So − how do we develop love and compassion and what are the benefits?

“The more we care for the happiness of others, the greater our own sense of well-being becomes. Cultivating a close, warm-hearted feeling for others automatically puts the mind at ease. This helps remove whatever fears or insecurities we may have and gives us the strength to cope with any obstacles we encounter. It is the ultimate source of success in life.”

Why does love and compassion bring happiness?

“Ultimately, the reason why love and compassion bring the greatest happiness is simply that our nature cherishes them above all else. The need for love lies at the very foundation of human existence. It results from the profound interdependence we all share with one another. However capable and skillful an individual may be, left alone, he or she will not survive. However vigorous and independent one may feel during the most prosperous periods of life, when one is sick or very young or very old, one must depend on the support of others.”

The Dalai Lama further explains that interdependence is a fundamental law of nature.  He mentions that the smallest insects are social beings who survive through mutual cooperation innately knowing they are interconnected.

In fact; oceans, forests, clouds, and flowers, arise because of the interaction of subtle energy patterns.

“It is because our own human existence is so dependent on the help of others that our need for love lies at the very foundation of our existence.”

The Tibetan teacher points out;

“If the child is not held, hugged, cuddled, or loved, its development will be impaired and its brain will not mature properly.”

He observes and surmises;

“Nowadays, many children grow up in unhappy homes. If they do not receive proper affection, in later life they will rarely love their parents and, not infrequently, will find it hard to love others.”

And, the conclusion is;

“the affection and respect of others are vital for our happiness.”

But it doesn’t end here. Part two will follow next post.

Source:  His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet website.